Last modified on 9 November 2014, at 08:37

EnglishEdit

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 Man (disambiguation) on Wikipedia

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EtymologyEdit

The noun is from Middle English man, from Old English mann (human being, person, man), from Proto-Germanic *mann- (human being, man), probably from Proto-Indo-European *man- (man) (compare also *men- (mind)). Cognate with West Frisian man, Dutch man, German Mann (man), Norwegian mann (man), Old Swedish maþer (man), Swedish man, Russian муж (muž, male person), Avestan 𐬨𐬀𐬥𐬱 (manuš), Sanskrit मनु (manu, human being).

The verb is from Middle English mannen, from Old English mannian, ġemannian (to man, supply with men, populate, garrison), from mann (human being, man). Cognate with Dutch mannen (to man), German mannen (to man), Swedish bemanna (to man), Icelandic manna (to supply with men, man).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

man (plural men)

  1. An adult male human.
    The show is especially popular with middle-aged men.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Henry V, act 4, scene 1:
      The king is but a man, as I am; the violet smells to him as it doth to me.
    • 1910, Emerson Hough, chapter 1, The Purchase Price:
      [] it is not fair of you to bring against mankind double weapons ! Dangerous enough you are as woman alone, without bringing to your aid those gifts of mind suited to problems which men have been accustomed to arrogate to themselves.”
  2. (collective) All human males collectively: mankind.
    • 2011, Eileen Gray and the Design of Sapphic Modernity: Staying In, page 109:
      Unsurprisingly, if modern man is a sort of camera, modern woman is a picture.
  3. A human, a person of either gender, usually an adult. (See usage notes.)
    every man for himself
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2, act 4, scene 2:
      [] a man cannot make him laugh.
    • 1611, Bible (KJV), Romans 12.17:
      Recompence to no man euill for euill.
    • c. 1700, Joseph Addison, Monaco, Genoa, &c., page 9:
      A man would expect, in so very ancient a town of Italy, to find some considerable antiquities; but all they have to show of this nature is an old Rostrum of a Roman ship, that stands over the door of their arsenal.
    • 1991 edition (original: 1953), Darell Huff, How to Lie with Statistics, pages 19–20:
      Similarly, the next time you learn from your reading that the average man (you hear a good deal about him these days, most of it faintly improbable) brushes his teeth 1.02 times a day – a figure I have just made up, but it may be as good as anyone else's – ask yourself a question. How can anyone have found out such a thing? Is a woman who has read in countless advertisements that non-brushers are social offenders going to confess to a stranger that she does not brush her teeth regularly?
  4. (collective) All humans collectively: mankind, humankind, humanity. (Sometimes capitalized as Man.)
    • 1647, Westminster Shorter Catechism, question 10:
      How did God create man?
      God created man male and female, after his own image, in knowledge, righteousness, and holiness, with dominion over the creatures.
    • 2013 July 20, “Old soldiers?”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8845: 
      Whether modern, industrial man is less or more warlike than his hunter-gatherer ancestors is impossible to determine. The machine gun is so much more lethal than the bow and arrow that comparisons are meaningless.
  5. (anthropology, archaeology, paleontology) A member of the genus Homo, especially of the species Homo sapiens.
    • 1990, The Almanac of Science and Technology (ISBN 0151050503), page 68:
      The evidence suggests that close relatives of early man, in lineages that later became extinct, also were able to use tools.
  6. (obsolete) A sentient being, whether human or supernatural.
    • c. 1500, A Gest of Robyn Hode, in the Child Ballads:
      For God is holde a ryghtwys man.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Much Ado about Nothing, act 3, scene 5:
      God's a good man.
    • 1609, Ben Jonson, Epicœne, or The silent woman:
      Expect: But was the devil a proper man, gossip?
      As fine a gentleman of his inches as ever I saw trusted to the stage, or any where else.
  7. An adult male who has, to an eminent degree, qualities considered masculine, such as strength, integrity, and devotion to family; a mensch.
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island:
      He’s more a man than any pair of rats of you in this here house []
    • 2011, Timothy Shephard, Can We Help Us?: Growing Up Bi-Racial in America (ISBN 1456754610), page 181:
      I had the opportunity to marry one of them but wasn't mature enough to be a man and marry her and be close to the [...] children and raise them []
  8. (uncountable, obsolete, uncommon) Manliness; the quality or state of being manly.
  9. A husband.
    • Book of Common Prayer:
      I pronounce that they are man and wife.
    • 1715, Joseph Addison, The Freeholder:
      In the next place, every wife ought to answer for her man.
  10. A lover; a boyfriend.
  11. A male enthusiast or devotee; a male who is very fond of or devoted to a specified kind of thing. (Used as the last element of a compound.)
    Some people prefer apple pie, but me, I’m a cherry pie man.
  12. A person, usually male, who has duties or skills associated with a specified thing. (Used as the last element of a compound.)
    I always wanted to be a guitar man on a road tour, but instead I’m a flag man on a road crew.
  13. A person, usually male, who can fulfill one's requirements with regard to a specified matter.
    • 2007, Thriller: Stories to Keep You Up All Night (ISBN 0778324567), page 553:
      "She's the man for the job."
    • 2008, Soccer Dad: A Father, a Son, and a Magic Season (ISBN 160239329X), page 148:
      Joanie volunteered, of course — if any dirty job is on offer requiring running, she's your man
    • 2012, The Island Caper: A Jake Lafferty Action Novel (ISBN 1622951999), page 34:
      He also owns the only backhoe tractor on Elbow Cay, so whenever anyone needs a cistern dug, he's their man.
  14. A male who belongs to a particular group: an employee, a student or alumnus, a representative, etc.
    • 1909, Harper's Weekly, volume 53, page iii:
      When President Roosevelt goes walking in the country about Washington he is always accompanied by two Secret Service men.
    • 1913, Robert Herrick, One Woman's Life, page 46:
      "And they're very good people, I assure you — he's a Harvard man." It was the first time Milly had met on intimate terms a graduate of a large university.
  15. An adult male servant. (historical) A vassal. A subject.
    Like master, like man. (old proverb)
    all the king's men
    • c. 1700s,, William Blackstone:
      The vassal, or tenant, kneeling, ungirt, uncovered, and holding up his hands between those of his lord, professed that he did become his man from that day forth, of life, limb, and earthly honour.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, The Celebrity:
      No matter how early I came down, I would find him on the veranda, smoking cigarettes, or otherwise his man would be there with a message to say that his master would shortly join me if I would kindly wait.
  16. A piece or token used in board games such as chess.
    • 1883, Henry Richter, Chess Simplified!, page 4:
      The white men are always put on that side of the board which commences by row I, and the black men are placed opposite.
  17. (MLE, slang) Used to refer to oneself or one's group: I, we; construed in the third person.
    • 2011, Top Boy:
      Sully: If it weren’t for that snake ... Man wouldn’t even be in this mess right now.
  18. A term of familiar address often implying on the part of the speaker some degree of authority, impatience, or haste.
    Come on, man, we've no time to lose!

Usage notesEdit

  • The most common modern sense of the word is “an adult male human”, not “a generic human” or “humankind”, which explains the awkwardness of the following sentence:
    Man, like other mammals, breastfeeds his young.[1]
  • Nonsexist language advocates recommend the use of human, human being, humankind, or person, depending on context, instead of man.

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

VerbEdit

man (third-person singular simple present mans, present participle manning, simple past and past participle manned)

  1. (transitive) To supply (something) with staff or crew (of either sex).
    The shipped was manned with a small crew.
  2. (transitive) To take up position in order to operate (something).
    Man the machine guns!
  3. (reflexive, possibly dated) To brace (oneself), to fortify or steel (oneself) in a manly way. (Compare man up.)
    • 1876, Julian Hawthorne, Saxon Studies:
      he manned himself heroically
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To wait on, attend to or escort.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To accustom (a hawk or other bird) to the presence of men.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

InterjectionEdit

man

  1. Used to place emphasis upon something or someone; sometimes, but not always, when actually addressing a man.
    Man, that was a great catch!

QuotationsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Nonsexist Language Guideline, the University of New Hampshire.

StatisticsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch man.

NounEdit

man (plural manne)

  1. man

AlbanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Syncopated form of Gheg mand, from Proto-Albanian *manta.

NounEdit

man m (indefinite plural mana, definite singular mani, definite plural manat)

  1. mulberry, mulberry tree

HyponymsEdit


BagirmiEdit

NounEdit

man

  1. water

ReferencesEdit

  • R. C. Stevenson, Bagirmi Grammar (1969)

Chinook JargonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English man.

NounEdit

man

  1. man

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

man

  1. male

AntonymsEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse mǫn, from Proto-Indo-European *mon- (neck).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /maːn/, [mæːˀn]

NounEdit

man c (singular definite manen, plural indefinite maner)

  1. mane (longer hair growth on back of neck of a horse)
InflectionEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse menn, plural form of maðr (man). Transition to pronoun by German influence.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

man

  1. you
  2. they, people
  3. we, one

Etymology 3Edit

See mane.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /maːn/, [mæːˀn]

VerbEdit

man

  1. Imperative of mane.

DutchEdit

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch man, from Proto-Germanic *mann-, probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *man-. Cognate with English and West Frisian man, German Mann, Danish mand.

NounEdit

man m (plural mannen, diminutive mannetje n or manneke n)

also has Archaic plurals: lieden and lui
  1. man human male, either adult or age-irrespective
    De oude man en de zee.
    The Old Man and the Sea.
  2. husband, male spouse

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FaroeseEdit

VerbEdit

man

  1. First and third-person singular present of munna
    I, he, she, it will / may

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

PronounEdit

man

  1. (colloquial) one, they (indefinite third-person singular pronoun)

SynonymsEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin manus.

NounEdit

man m (plural mans)

  1. hand

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin manus. Compare Catalan , French main, Italian mano, Occitan man, Portuguese mão, Romanian mână, Sardinian manu, Spanish mano.

NounEdit

man f (plural mans)

  1. (anatomy) hand

Usage notesEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the same source as Mann (adult male).[1]

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

man

  1. one, they (indefinite third-person singular pronoun)
    was man sehen kann — what one can see
    • 2008, Frank Behmeta, Wenn ich die Augen öffne, page 55:
      Kann man es fühlen, wenn man schwanger ist?
      Can a person who is pregnant feel it?

Usage notesEdit

  • Because man derives from the word for a “man” (an adult male), its use, especially when writing about women, is considered sexist by some. Feminists have proposed alternating man and frau, or the generic words mensch or man*. Compare the use of she vs he in English to refer to someone whose gender is unknown.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Theo Stemmler: Wie das Eisbein ins Lexikon kam, page 15, ISBN 978-3-411-72291-4.

German Low GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Saxon man, from Proto-Germanic *mann-, probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *man-.

ConjunctionEdit

man

  1. (in many dialects, including Low Prussian) only; but

SynonymsEdit

  • (in various dialects) avers, awer (and many variations thereof; for which, see those entries)
  • (in some dialects) bloots

GothicEdit

RomanizationEdit

man

  1. Romanization of 𐌼𐌰𐌽

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

man n (genitive singular mans)

  1. (chiefly poetic) maiden

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

man

  1. Past, first person of the verb of muna I remember
    Ég man ekki.
    I don't remember.
  2. Past, third person of the verb of muna he/she/it remembered
    Hann man hvað gerðist.
    He remembered what happened.

IstriotEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin manus.

NounEdit

man m

  1. hand

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

man

  1. rōmaji reading of まん
  2. rōmaji reading of マン

KurdishEdit

VerbEdit

man

  1. to stay
  2. to remain

LadinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin manus.

NounEdit

man f (plural mans)

  1. hand

LatvianEdit

PronounEdit

man

  1. to me; dative singular form of es

LigurianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin manus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

man f (plural moæn IPA(key): [mwæŋ])

  1. hand

LithuanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

mán

  1. (first-person singular) dative form of .
    Duok man knygą.
    Give me that book.

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

man

  1. rafsi of manku.

MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

man

  1. Nonstandard spelling of mān.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of mán.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of mǎn.
  4. Nonstandard spelling of màn.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

man

  1. you
  2. one
  3. they
  4. people

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

man

  1. mane (of a horse)

Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

man f (definite singular mana, indefinite plural maner, definite plural manene)

  1. mane (of a horse)

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin manus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

man f (plural mans)

  1. hand

Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *mann-, probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *man-. Compare Old Saxon man, Old High German man, Old Frisian man, mon, Old English mann, Old Norse maðr.

NounEdit

man m

  1. human, person
  2. man

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From mann.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

man

  1. one, someone, they (often used to form the passive)

Etymology 2Edit

Cognate with Old Saxon mēn, Old High German mein, Old Norse mein.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mān n

  1. crime, sin, wickedness

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *mann-, probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *man-. Compare Old Saxon man, Dutch man, Old English mann, Old Frisian man, mon, Old Norse maðr, Gothic 𐌼𐌰𐌽𐌽𐌰 (manna).

NounEdit

man m

  1. man

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *mann-, probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *man-. Compare Old English mann, Old Frisian man, mon, Old Dutch man, Old High German man, Old Norse maðr.

NounEdit

man m

  1. human, person
  2. man

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • German Low German: Mann

Scottish GaelicEdit

PrepositionEdit

man

  1. Alternative form of mar

Usage notesEdit

  • Unlike mar, man does not lenite the following word.

SwedishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Swedish maþer, mander, from Old Norse maðr, from Proto-Germanic *mann-, probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *man-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

man c

  1. a man (adult male human)
  2. a husband
  3. a member of a crew, workforce or (military) troop
    I äldre tider sa man att björnen ägde sju mans styrka men en mans vett.
    In older times, they said the bear has the strength of seven men but the sense of one man.
DeclensionEdit

PronounEdit

man c

  1. (indefinite) one, they; people in general
    Vad man kan se
    What one can see
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse mǫn, from Proto-Germanic *manō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

man c

  1. mane (of a horse or lion)
DeclensionEdit

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English man.

NounEdit

man

  1. man (adult male human)
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, Genesis 2:5 (translation here):
      ...i no gat diwai na gras samting i kamap long graun yet, long wanem, em i no salim ren i kam daun yet. Na i no gat man bilong wokim gaden.

AdjectiveEdit

man

  1. male


This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


Torres Strait CreoleEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English man.

NounEdit

man

  1. husband
  2. a married man
  3. any man

VenetianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin manus. Compare Italian mano

NounEdit

man f (invariable)

  1. hand

VolapükEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from English man (compare Dutch: man, Swedish: man, Norwegian: mann, German: Mann, German Low German: Mann, Yiddish: מאַן (man, man)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

man (plural mans)

  1. man (adult male human)

DeclensionEdit

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

man m, f (plural mannau)

  1. place

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
man fan unchanged unchanged

West FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian man, from Proto-Germanic *mann-, probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *man-. Compare English and Dutch man, German Mann, Danish mand.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

man (plural men or manlju)

  1. man
  2. husband

Wik-MungkanEdit

NounEdit

man

  1. neck

Derived termsEdit