Last modified on 15 December 2014, at 17:45

avuncular

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin avunculus (maternal uncle).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

avuncular (comparative more avuncular, superlative most avuncular)

  1. In the manner of an uncle, pertaining to an uncle.
    • 1997, David Nokes, Jane Austen: A Life:
      Both uncle Frank and uncle Stephen Austen had made it a point of principle to be rigorously unsentimental in the discharge of their avuncular obligations.
  2. (by extension) Kind, genial, benevolent, or tolerant.
    • 2003, Vicki Croke, "New leader of the MSPCA moves to tame budget woes," Boston Globe, September 20:
      Thornton's reputation was that of a soft-hearted and avuncular veterinarian known for getting teary-eyed while listening to even slightly sentimental stories.
    • 1987, William Schneider, "The New Shape of American Politics," The Atlantic, January:
      A man with such a nice, avuncular personality would not blow up the world.

Coordinate termsEdit

TranslationsEdit