Last modified on 21 December 2014, at 07:25

bedight

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English bedighten, bidihten, equivalent to be- +‎ dight.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bedight (third-person singular simple present bedights, present participle bedighting, simple past and past participle bedight or bedighted)

  1. (archaic) to equip or bedeck
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses:
      Who comes through Michan’s land, bedight in sable armour? O’Bloom, the son of Rory: it is he.
    • 1843, Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost Story of Christmas:
      In half a minute Mrs Cratchit entered – flushed, but smiling proudly – with the pudding, like a speckled cannon-ball, so hard and firm, blazing in half of half-a-quartern of ignited brandy, and bedight with Christmas holly stuck into the top.