Last modified on 24 May 2014, at 01:17

bever

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English beveren (to tremble), frequentative form of Old English beofian, bifian (to tremble, be moved, shake, quake), from Proto-Germanic *bibōną, *bibjaną (to quake, shiver), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰoyǝ- (to frighten, be afraid). Cognate with Eastern Frisian bevern (to shiver), Dutch bibberen (to shiver, quiver), Low German beveren (to shiver), Dutch beven (to quake), German beben (to quake, tremble), Swedish bäva (to quake, tremble), Icelandic bifa (to budge, be moved), Latin foedus (disgusting, shocking, abominable, heinous).

VerbEdit

bever (third-person singular simple present bevers, present participle bevering, simple past and past participle bevered)

  1. (intransitive) To tremble; shake; quiver; shiver.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte D'Arthur, page 25:
      Wherefore King Ban and King Bors made them ready, and dressed their shields and harness, and they were so courageous that many knights shook and bevered for eagerness.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French baviere (child's bib), from baver (to slaver).

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

bever (plural bevers)

  1. A movable covering for the mouth and chin on a close helmet.
    • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, page 8:
      Some close helmets have a farther improvement called a bever, the bever when closed covers the mouth and chin, and either lifts up by revolving on the same pivots as the visor, or lets down by means of two or more pivots on each side near the jaws, in which case the bever consists of several laminæ or plates, one shutting over the other.

Etymology 3Edit

Anglo-Norman bever, from Old French beivre (drinking, drink, to drink) (French boire), from Latin bibō.

NounEdit

bever (plural bevers)

  1. A drink.
  2. (now rare, archaic) A snack or light refreshment between meals.
    • 1604, Christopher Marlowe, Dr. Faustus:
      Thirty meals a day and ten bevers.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.2:
      It seemeth that wee daily shorten the use of this, and that in our houses (as I have seene in mine infancie) breakfasts, nunchions, and beavers [transl. collations] should be more frequent and often used than now adayes they are.
    • 1980, Anthony Burgess, Earthly Powers:
      Very softly I boiled water, made a sandwich from the remains of the luncheon roast chicken, scalded the Twining creature. Then I softly carried my bever to the study on a tray [...].
SynonymsEdit

VerbEdit

bever (third-person singular simple present bevers, present participle bevering, simple past and past participle bevered)

  1. (obsolete) To take a light repast between meals.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch *bever, from Proto-Germanic *bebruz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bever m (plural bevers, diminutive bevertje n)

  1. beaver

AnagramsEdit


HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

be- + ver

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɛvɛr/
  • Hyphenation: be‧ver

VerbEdit

bever

  1. to knock (one’s head) (-ba/-be)
    A kisfiú véletlenül beverte a fejét az asztalba. — The little boy accidentally knocked his head into the table.
  2. to drive in (nails) (-ba/-be)
    Beverte a szögeket a falba. — S/he drove the nails into the wall.

ConjugationEdit


LadinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin bibō, bibere.

VerbEdit

bever (Latin spelling)

  1. to drink

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German bever (compare Dutch bever, German Biber and English beaver). The word replaced Old Norse bjórr (compare Norwegian Nynorsk bjor).

NounEdit

bever m (definite singular beveren; indefinite plural bevere/bevrer/bevre; definite plural beverne/bevrene)

  1. beaver (aquatic mammal)
    En bever kan veie opptil 40 kg.
    A beaver can weigh up to 40 kg.
  2. a beaver's fur
    Kåpen er av bever.
    The coat is made of beaver fur.
  3. a 6 to 8 year old member of the Scouting

ReferencesEdit

  • bever” in The Ordnett Dictionary
  • “bever” in The Bokmål Dictionary / The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • Article in Store norske leksikon ("great Norwegian encyclopedia") on beavers.

Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Low German bever (compare Dutch bever, German Biber and English beaver). The word replaced Old Norse bjórr (compare Norwegian Nynorsk bjor).

NounEdit

bever m (definite singular beveren, indefinite plural beverar, definite plural beverane)

  1. beaver (aquatic mammal)
    Ein bever kan vege opptil 40 kg.
    A beaver can weigh up to 40 kg.
  2. a beaver's fur
    Kåpa er av bever.
    The coat is made of beaver fur.
  3. a 6 to 8 year old member of the Scouting

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • bever” in The Ordnett Dictionary
  • “bever” in The Bokmål Dictionary / The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  • Article in Store norske leksikon ("great Norwegian encyclopedia") on beavers.

Old FrenchEdit

Etymology 1Edit

see beivre

VerbEdit

bever

  1. Alternative form of beivre.

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *bebruz. More at English beaver.

NounEdit

bever m (oblique plural bevers, nominative singular bevers, nominative plural bever)

  1. beaver (mammal)

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin bibō, bibere.

VerbEdit

bever

  1. (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) to drink