Last modified on 7 November 2013, at 18:32

carpale

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From New Latin ōs carpāle, from Ancient Greek καρπός (karpós, wrist).

NounEdit

carpale (plural carpalia)

  1. (anatomy) One of the bones or cartilages of the carpus, especially one of the series articulating with the metacarpals.
    • 1891, The Annals and Magazine of Natural History (page 201)
      [] this being the case the bone in question contains at any rate the centrale, and I see no reason why the carpale 2 should have quite disappeared.
    • 1973, Radomír Čihák, Ontogenesis of the skeleton and intrinsic muscles of the human hand and foot (page 36)
      This indicates that the pisiform is really a secondary component which became the carpale during phylogenesis.
    • 2012, Jin Bo Tang, Peter C. Amadio, Jean Claude Guimberteau, Tendon Surgery of the Hand (page 10)
      The dorsal interossei are sometimes found to originate more proximal at the base of the metacarpals or even at the carpalia.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

carpale m, f (masculine and feminine plural carpali)

  1. (anatomy) carpal

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AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

carpāle

  1. nominative neuter singular of carpālis
  2. accusative neuter singular of carpālis
  3. vocative neuter singular of carpālis