Last modified on 28 August 2014, at 21:11

cynic

See also: Cynic

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English cynike, cynicke, from Middle French cinicque, from Latin cynicus, from Ancient Greek κυνικός (kunikós), originally derived from the portico in Athens called Κυνόσαργες (Kunósarges), the earliest home of the Cynic school, later reinterpreted as a derivation of κύων (kúōn, dog), in a contemptuous allusion to the uncouth and aggressive manners adopted by the members of the school.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

cynic (comparative more cynic, superlative most cynic)

  1. cynical (in all senses)
  2. (not comparable) Relating to the Dog Star.
    the cynic, or Sothic, year; cynic cycle

NounEdit

cynic (plural cynics)

  1. A person who believes that all people are motivated by selfishness.
  2. A person whose outlook is scornfully negative.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

cynic m (feminine singular cynicque, masculine plural cynics, feminine plural cynicques)

  1. cynical