Last modified on 30 October 2014, at 17:52

deficit

See also: déficit

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French déficit, from Latin dēficit.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

deficit (plural deficits)

  1. Deficiency in amount or quality; a falling short; lack.
  2. A situation wherein, or amount whereby, spending exceeds government revenue.
    • 2013 September 28, Kenan Malik, "London Is Special, but Not That Special," New York Times (retrieved 28 September 2013):
      Economically, too, London is startlingly different. The capital, unlike the country as a whole, has no budget deficit: London’s public spending matches the taxes paid in the city. The average Londoner contributes 70 percent more to Britain’s national income than people in the rest of the country.
    • 1996 August 4, “It's Time for a Reality Check on the Deficit”, Contra Costa Times, Contra Costa, CA:
      But Wall Street, which has a case of deficit-attention disorder, is no longer focused on a balanced budget. "The bond market only worries about one thing at [a time.]

SynonymsEdit

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CzechEdit

NounEdit

deficit m

  1. deficit

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

deficit m (invariable)

  1. deficit (financial, medical)

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

dēficit

  1. third-person singular present active indicative of deficiō

Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

dȅficit m (Cyrillic spelling де̏фицит)

  1. deficit (financial)

DeclensionEdit