Last modified on 17 April 2014, at 12:10

detractor

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman detractour, from Old French detractor.

NounEdit

detractor (plural detractors)

  1. A person who belittles the worth of another person or cause.
    • 2012, Tom Lamont, How Mumford & Sons became the biggest band in the world (in The Daily Telegraph, 15 November 2012)[1]
      Four polite Englishmen in their middle 20s, feigning like firewater drunks in a Eugene O'Neill play: it's exactly the stuff that makes their detractors groan.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dētractor m (genitive dētractōris); third declension

  1. detractor, disparager

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative dētractor dētractōrēs
genitive dētractōris dētractōrum
dative dētractōrī dētractōribus
accusative dētractōrem dētractōrēs
ablative dētractōre dētractōribus
vocative dētractor dētractōrēs

VerbEdit

dētractor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of dētractō