diasporan

EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

diasporan (comparative more diasporan, superlative most diasporan)

  1. Of or pertaining to a diaspora
    • 1994 August 19, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “Tribal Trouble”, Chicago Reader:
      The process by which ethnic sites become calendar illustrations--and ethnicity and history become a commodity--entails a chain of communication that passes from nationalist to diasporan to assimilationist, bringing the first two closer together and moving the second two further apart, a chain all of us are involved in nowadays on multiple levels, in relation to both our own families and ethnic roots and those of others.
    • 1995 January 6, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “The 31 best movies of 1994”, Chicago Reader:
      Using some of his familiar loop strategies, whereby the same material gets compulsively replayed, Egoyan tells a story about a marriage that disintegrates during a trip from North America to Armenia, where an assimilated Canadian-Armenian photographer (Egoyan himself), while shooting a dozen rural churches for a calendar, becomes insanely jealous when his diasporan Armenian wife (Egoyan's real-life wife Arsinee Khanjian) converses with their guide in Armenian.
    • 1998 November 20, Peter Margasak, “DKV Trio With Johannes Bauer, Axel Dorner & Thomas Lehn”, Chicago Reader:
      Not ripoff but great triumph of; the world adopts the diasporan esthetic."

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FinnishEdit

NounEdit

diasporan

  1. Genitive singular form of diaspora.

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 15 August 2013, at 06:10