Last modified on 15 December 2014, at 23:33

diatribe

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

First attested 1581, from French diatribe, from Latin diatriba (learned discussion or discourse), from Ancient Greek διατριβή (diatribḗ, way of spending time, lecture), from διά (diá, through) + τρίβω (tríbō, I waste, wear out)

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdaɪ.əˌtɹaɪb/

NounEdit

diatribe (plural diatribes)

  1. An abusive, bitter, attack, or criticism: denunciation.
    • 1913, Robert Barr, chapter 4, Lord Stranleigh Abroad[1]:
      “… No rogue e’er felt the halter draw, with a good opinion of the law, and perhaps my own detestation of the law arises from my having frequently broken it. If this long diatribe bores you, just say so, and I’ll cut it short.”
  2. A prolonged discourse.
  3. A speech or writing which bitterly denounces something.
    The senator was prone to diatribes which could go on for more than an hour.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

QuotationsEdit

1991, Bill Crow, Jazz Anecdotes[2], Oxford University Press, ISBN 9780195071337, page 316:
You know, it’s all this racial diatribe, and very strong language, screaming at the top of his lungs into the telephone.
2000, J. K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Scholastic Press, ISBN 9780439139595, page 41:
Aunt Petunia wasn’t eating anything at all. Her arms were folded, her lips were pursed, and she seemed to be chewing her tongue, as though biting back the furious diatribe she longed to throw at Harry.

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin diatriba (learned discussion or discourse), from Ancient Greek διατριβή (diatribḗ, way of spending time, lecture), from διά (diá, through) + τρίβω (tríbō, I waste, wear out)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

diatribe f (plural diatribes)

  1. diatribe (abusive, bitter discourse)

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

diatribe f

  1. plural form of diatriba

AnagramsEdit