Last modified on 7 July 2014, at 23:02

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English dint, dent, dünt, from Old English dynt (dint, blow, strike, stroke, bruise, stripe; the mark left by a blow; the sound or noise made by a blow, thud), from Proto-Germanic *duntiz (a blow), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰen- (to strike, hit). Cognate with Swedish dialectal dunt, Icelandic dyntr (a dint). More at dent.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

dint (countable and uncountable, plural dints)

  1. (obsolete) A blow, stroke, especially dealt in a fight.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, I.i:
      Much daunted with that dint, her sence was dazd [...].
    • 1600, Edward Fairfax, The Jerusalem Delivered of Tasso, XI, xxxi:
      Between them cross-bows stood, and engines wrought
      To cast a stone, a quarry, or a dart,
      From whence, like thunder's dint, or lightnings new,
      Against the bulwarks stones and lances flew.
  2. Force, power; especially in by dint of.
    • Shakespeare
      Now you weep; and, I perceive, you feel / The dint of pity.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      It was by dint of passing strength / That he moved the massy stone at length.
  3. The mark left by a blow; an indentation or impression made by violence; a dent.
    • Tennyson
      every dint a sword had beaten in it [the shield]
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

dint (third-person singular simple present dints, present participle dinting, simple past and past participle dinted)

  1. To dent
    • 1915, Jeffery Farnol, Beltane The Smith[1]:
      And, in that moment came one, fierce and wild of aspect, in dinted casque and rusty mail who stood and watched--ah God!
    • 1854, W. Harrison Ainsworth, The Star-Chamber, Volume 2[2]:
      Your helmet was dinted in as if by a great shot.

Etymology 2Edit

ContractionEdit

dint

  1. Eye dialect spelling of didn’t.

AnagramsEdit


FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dēns, dentem. Compare Italian dente, Romansch dent, Venetian dénte, Romanian dinte, French dent, Spanish diente.

NounEdit

dint m (plural dinčh)

  1. tooth

Derived termsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

dint (plural dints)

  1. dent
  2. blow, stroke
    • Sir Gawain and the Green Knight,
      Ayein his dyntez sore ye may not yow defende.

WalloonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French dent, from Late Latin *dente, from Classical Latin dēns, dentem.

NounEdit

dint f

  1. (anatomy) tooth