Last modified on 26 November 2014, at 08:26

disquieting

EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

disquieting (comparative more disquieting, superlative most disquieting)

  1. Causing mental trouble or anguish; upsetting; making uneasy.
    • 1915, George A. Birmingham, Gossamer, Ch.I:
      It is never possible to settle down to the ordinary routine of life at sea until the screw begins to revolve. There is an hour or two, after the passengers have embarked, which is disquieting and fussy.

VerbEdit

disquieting

  1. Present participle of disquiet.

NounEdit

disquieting (plural disquietings)

  1. The act by which someone or something is disquieted.
    • Edward Reynolds
      Thus we see the intuition of divine truth in minds of defiled affections, worketh not that sweet effect which is natural unto it to produce; but doubtings, terrors, and disquietings of conscience []