Last modified on 21 November 2014, at 14:43
See also: ing, ing-, -ing-, Ing, and Ing.

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English -ing, from Old English -ing, -ung (-ing, suffix forming nouns from verbs), from Proto-Germanic *-ingō, *-ungō, from Proto-Indo-European *-enkw-. Cognate with West Frisian -ing (-ing), Dutch -ing (-ing), Low German -ing (-ing), German -ung (-ing), Swedish -ing (-ing), Icelandic -ing (-ing).

SuffixEdit

-ing

  1. Used to form gerunds, a type of verbal nouns, from verbs.
    the making of the film
  2. Used to form uncountable nouns from various parts of speech denoting materials or systems of objects considered collectively.
    Roofing is a material that covers a roof.
    Piping is a system of pipes considered collectively.
  3. Used to form nouns of the action or the procedure of a verb; usually identical with meaning 1. in the English language or expressed with -tion instead
    The forging of the sword took hours. - where forging denotes a planned procedure of work rather than a specific physical action
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

The translations below are a guide only. See individual words for precise translations.

See alsoEdit

  • (collection): work

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English -inge, -ynge, alteration of earlier -inde, -ende, -and (see -and), from Old English -ende (present participle ending), from Proto-Germanic *-andz (present participle ending), from Proto-Indo-European *-nt-. Cognate with Dutch -end, German -end, Gothic -𐌰𐌽𐌳 (-and), Latin -ans, -ant-, Ancient Greek -ον (-on), Sanskrit -अन्त् (-ant). More at -and.

SuffixEdit

-ing

  1. Used to form present participles of verbs.
    Rolling stones gather no moss.
    You are making a mess.
    • a. 2001, Brian Hall, “Beej's Guide to Network Programming”, “Using Internet Sockets”
      If you are connect()ing to a remote machine [] you can simply call connect(), it'll check to see if the socket is unworthy, and will bind() it to an unused local port if necessary.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English -ing, from Old English -ing, from Proto-Germanic *-ingaz. Akin to Old Norse -ingr, Gothic -𐌹𐌲𐌲𐍃 (-iggs).

SuffixEdit

-ing

  1. Forming derivative nouns (originally masculine), with the senseson of, belonging to’, as patronymics or diminutives. No longer productive in either sense.
    Browning, Channing, Ewing
    bunting
    shilling
    farthing
  2. Having a specifed quality, characteristic, or nature; of the kind of
    sweeting
    whiting
    gelding
Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Allan Metcalf, How We Talk: American Regional English, Houghton Mifflin, Boston: 2000, p 143

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse -ingr, -angr, -ungr.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ing, -ning

  1. added to a verb to form a noun for an action or process, the result of or the subject performing such action
  2. designate a person of a certain origin or with certain qualities

Usage notesEdit

Nouns are in the common gender, and inflected -(n)ing -en, -er, -erne.

SynonymsEdit

  • (added to a verb to form a noun for an action or process): -else, -tion

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch -inge, from Old Dutch -unga, -onga, from Proto-Germanic *-ungō.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ing f (plural -ingen, diminutive -inkje or -ingetje)

  1. -ing; appended to a verb, this suffix is used to refer to the performance of the action of that verb, and the result thereof. The result is a verbal noun which in Dutch is called naamwoord van handeling (noun of action).

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ing

  1. suffix used to form nouns

Usage notesEdit


NorwegianEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ing f or m (see below)

  1. Used to form verbal nouns from verbs; -ing.
    Han var lei av masing.
    Norwegian

The gender is usually f if the word ended in -ing in Old Norse and m if it ended in -ingr or -ingi. Living things like islending (Icelander) and dumming (idiot) are usually m whilst inanimate things like stråling (radiation) and eting (the act of eating) usually are f.

Derived termsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Variant of -ung.

Alternative formsEdit

SuffixEdit

-ing f

  1. Forming nouns from verbs, indicating action, process or material.

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *-ingaz.

SuffixEdit

-ing m

  1. Forming derivatives of masculine nouns with sense of ‘belonging to, son of’.

SwedishEdit

SuffixEdit

-ing

  1. -ing; making nouns. See also -ning.

Derived termsEdit


UzbekEdit

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!
EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

SuffixEdit

-ing (-инг)

  1. second-person singular possessive suffix. Used after a noun ending in a consonant. It has the same meaning as sening (your) placed before a noun.
    Bu kitobing.
    This is your book.

Usage notesEdit

When directly addressing another person, it is polite to use the plural -ingiz or -ngiz forms.