Last modified on 22 October 2014, at 18:21

distract

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin distraho (to pull apart), from dis- + traho (to pull).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

distract (third-person singular simple present distracts, present participle distracting, simple past and past participle distracted)

  1. (transitive) To divert the attention of.
    • 2011 December 10, David Ornstein, “Arsenal 1-0 Everton”, BBC Sport:
      While Gunners boss Arsene Wenger had warned his players against letting the pre-match festivities distract them from the task at hand, they clearly struggled for fluency early on.
    • 2013 June 29, “Travels and travails”, The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 55: 
      Even without hovering drones, a lurking assassin, a thumping score and a denouement, the real-life story of Edward Snowden, a rogue spy on the run, could be straight out of the cinema. But, as with Hollywood, the subplots and exotic locations may distract from the real message: America’s discomfort and its foes’ glee.
    'The crowd was distracted by a helicopter hovering over the stadium when the only goal of the game was scored.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

distract (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) Separated; drawn asunder.
  2. (obsolete) Insane; mad.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Drayton to this entry?)