Last modified on 23 January 2014, at 17:33

down the hatch

EnglishEdit

Prepositional phraseEdit

down the hatch

  1. (idiomatic) Into the mouth and down the throat, especially with regard to the consumption of a beverage.
    • 1943 March 22, "AIR: You've Had It," Time (retrieved 7 Feb 2010):
      In Cairo, the New York Herald Tribune's correspondent, John ("Tex") O'Reilly, found U.S. soldiers no less infected with the new English language: "When two Americans are having a drink they no longer shout ‘Down the hatch!’ They raise their glasses and say ‘Cheers’ in modulated tones."
    • 2008 Jan. 30, Paul Lukas, "Gluttonous Rite Survives Without Silverware ," New York Times (retrieved 7 Feb 2010):
      As waiters brought trays of meat, the guests reached over and harvested the pink slices with their bare hands, popping them down the hatch.

TranslationsEdit