Last modified on 20 May 2014, at 01:29

envious

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French envieus, envious (modern French envieux), from Vulgar Latin *enviōsus, from Latin invidiōsus.; more at envy.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

envious (comparative more envious, superlative most envious)

  1. Feeling or exhibiting envy; jealously desiring the excellence or good fortune of another; maliciously grudging
    an envious man, disposition, or attack; envious tongues
    • Bible, Proverbs xxiv. 19.
      Neither be thou envious at the wicked.
    • Keble
      My soul is envious of mine eye.
  2. Excessively careful; cautious.
    • Jeremy Taylor
      No men are so envious of their health.
  3. (obsolete) Malignant; mischievous; spiteful.
    • Shakespeare
      Each envious brier his weary legs doth scratch.
  4. (obsolete, poetic) Inspiring envy.
    • Spenser
      He to him leapt, and that same envious gage / Of victor's glory from him snatched away.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit



Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *enviōsus, from Latin invidiōsus.

AdjectiveEdit

envious m (feminine enviouse)

  1. envious; jealous
    • circa 1170, Wace, Le Roman de Rou:
      Mez mult part fu cruel e mult fu envious
      But [he] was very cruel and very jealous

DescendantsEdit