Last modified on 16 December 2014, at 04:45

erudite

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin ērudītus, participle of ērudiō (educate, train), from e- (out of) + rudis (rude, unskilled).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

erudite (comparative more erudite, superlative most erudite)

  1. Learned, scholarly, with emphasis on knowledge gained from books.
    • 1850, Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter, Ch. XII:
      At all events, if it involved any secret information in regard to old Roger Chillingworth, it was in a tongue unknown to the erudite clergyman, and did but increase the bewilderment of his mind.
    • 1913, Edith Wharton, The Custom of the Country, ch. 43:
      Elmer Moffatt had been magnificent, rolling out his alternating effects of humour and pathos, stirring his audience by moving references to the Blue and the Gray, convulsing them by a new version of Washington and the Cherry Tree . . ., dazzling them by his erudite allusions and apt quotations.
    • 2006, Jeff Israely, "Preaching Controversy," Time, 17 Sept.:
      Perhaps his erudite mind does not quite yet grasp how to transform his beloved scholarly explorations into effective papal politics.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

erudite

  1. feminine plural of erudito

NounEdit

erudite f

  1. plural form of erudita

VerbEdit

erudite

  1. second-person plural present indicative of erudire
  2. second-person plural imperative of erudire
  3. feminine plural of erudito

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ērudītus (educated, accomplished)

AdverbEdit

ērudītē (comparative ērudītius, superlative ērudītissimē)

  1. learnedly, with erudition

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, 1st edition. (Oxford University Press)