Last modified on 22 June 2014, at 01:08

face-to-face

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

face + to + face

NounEdit

face-to-face (plural face-to-faces)

  1. A meeting, especially a meeting between two people conducted in person as opposed to a meeting conducted at a distance through technology.
    • 2001, Darwin Porter, Hollywood's Silent Closet, page 607:
      "If you want to have a face-to-face with Charlie?" I asked W.R., "Why invite the rest of us?"
    • 2007, Dennis N. Griffin, Frank Cullotta, Dennis Arnoldy, Cullotta: The Life of a Chicago Criminal, Las Vegas Mobster and Government Witness, page 192:
      In an unprecedented move, Clifford went to Chicago to have a face-to-face with Tony's superiors.
    • 2011, Annie Jacobsen, Area 51: An Uncensored History of America's Top Secret Military Base, page 18:
      It was not like Friedman didn't try to have a face-to-face with Lazar.

AdjectiveEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

face-to-face (not comparable)

  1. In one another's presence.
    • a face-to-face meeting

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

face-to-face (not comparable)

  1. While physically present.

TranslationsEdit