Last modified on 29 August 2014, at 20:48

falciform

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin falx (sickle) +‎ -i- +‎ -form (-shaped).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) enPR: fălʹsĭfôrm, IPA(key): /ˈfæl.sɪ.fɔːm/, /ˈfɒl.sɪ.fɔːm/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfæl.sɪ.fɔɹm/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

falciform (comparative more falciform, superlative not attested)

  1. Sickle-shaped.
    • 1922: James Joyce, Ulysses, page 627
      What announced the accomplishment of this rise in temperature?
      A double falciform ejection of water vapour from under the kettlelid at both sides simultaneously.
    • 2009, Nick Laird, Glover's Mistake,
      David realized he’d been unconsciously pushing his nails into his palms, leaving little red falciform marks.

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