foederatus

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fiːdɛˈɹɑːtəs/

EtymologyEdit

From Latin foederātus (allied), from foedus (league, agreement)

NounEdit

foederatus (plural foederati)

  1. A confederate. One of the tribes bound by treaty, who were neither Roman colonies nor had they been granted Roman citizenship but were expected to provide a contingent of fighting men when trouble arose.
    • 2011, Norman Davies, Vanished Kingdoms, Penguin 2012, p. 23:
      In the middle stage, the Reges Gothorum saw themselves as something better than mere foederati.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Perfect passive participle of foederō

ParticipleEdit

foederātus m (feminine foederāta, neuter foederātum); first/second declension

  1. sealed, ratified (of an agreement or treaty)

InflectionEdit

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case \ Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative foederātus foederāta foederātum foederātī foederātae foederāta
genitive foederātī foederātae foederātī foederātōrum foederātārum foederātōrum
dative foederātō foederātae foederātō foederātīs foederātīs foederātīs
accusative foederātum foederātam foederātum foederātōs foederātās foederāta
ablative foederātō foederātā foederātō foederātīs foederātīs foederātīs
vocative foederāte foederāta foederātum foederātī foederātae foederāta
Last modified on 12 September 2013, at 23:25