Last modified on 21 August 2014, at 18:35

griddle

EnglishEdit

Pancakes on a griddle
An electric griddle

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman gredile or Old French gridil, from Latin crāticulum, diminutive of crātis.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

griddle (plural griddles)

  1. A flat plate of metal used for cooking.
    • 1871, Louisa May Alcott, Little Men, chapter 5:
      Such a clatter as the little spoon made, and such a beating as the batter got, it quite foamed, I assure you; and when Daisy poured some on to the griddle, it rose like magic into a puffy flapjack that made Demi's mouth water.
    • 1894, Lance Rawson, Australian enquiry book of household and general information, Cookery:
      Some people when making scones do not trouble to light the oven but use the frying pan: of course if you have a griddle it is better than oven or pan, but very few people possess this useful utensil.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

griddle (third-person singular simple present griddles, present participle griddling, simple past and past participle griddled)

  1. To use a griddle, to cook on a griddle.

AnagramsEdit