hurkle

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • hurple, hirple, hurtle

EtymologyEdit

A word of unknown origin, perhaps cognate with hirple or Dutch hurken 'to squat', plus the suffix -le.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

hurkle (third-person singular simple present hurkles, present participle hurkling, simple past and past participle hurkled)

  1. (intransitive) to draw in the parts of the body, especially with pain or cold
  2. to cower
  3. (of the limbs) to contract, to pull in

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tae hurkle (third-person singular simple present hurkles, present participle hurklin, simple past hurkled, past participle hurkled)

  1. to sit huddled in a crouched position either for warmth or secrecy, to draw oneself together like a crouching animal
  2. to walk with the body in a crouching position

Derived termsEdit

  • hurklin (hunchbacked, misshapen)

NounEdit

hurkle (plural hurkles)

  1. (anatomy) the upper part of the thigh, the hip

Derived termsEdit

Last modified on 20 June 2013, at 21:14