Last modified on 24 May 2014, at 21:07

imbricated

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Participle adjective of imbricate.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪmbɹɪkeɪtɪd/

AdjectiveEdit

imbricated (comparative more imbricated, superlative most imbricated)

  1. Overlapping, like scales or roof-tiles; intertwined.
    • 1965, John Fowles, The Magus:
      He stopped speaking for a moment, like a man walking who comes to a brink; perhaps it was an artful pause, but it made the stars, the night, seem to wait, as if story, narration, history, lay imbricated in the nature of things; and the cosmos was for the story, not the story for the cosmos.
    • 1996, Russell Hoban, Fremder, Bloomsbury 2003, p. 50:
      the spaceport filled up with emptiness and that imbricated silence made up of the low roar of the air-cycling system, the hum of the robot sweepers, the sizzle of the noctolux lamps, and the sound of distant footsteps.