EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English lufe, lofe (palm of the hand), from Old English *lōfa, from Proto-Germanic *lōfô (palm of the hand; paw; oar blade, paddle), from Proto-Indo-European *lāp-, *lēp- (to be flat). Cognate with Scots luif (the palm of the hand), Swedish love (wrist), Icelandic lófi (palm of the hand), Gothic [script?] (lófa, palm of the hand), German dialectal Laffe (flat hand, palm). Related to glove.

NounEdit

loof (plural loofs)

  1. (anatomy, now chiefly dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) The palm of the hand.
  2. (anatomy, now chiefly dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) The hand, especially, the hand outspread and upturned.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English lof (a contrivance for altering a ship's course, paddle, oar), from Middle Dutch loef (an oar or paddle used in steering), ultimately from the same origin as Etymology 1.

NounEdit

loof (plural loofs)

  1. (nautical, obsolete) A contrivance (apparently a paddle or an oar) used for altering the course of a ship.
  2. (nautical) The after part of the bow of a ship where the sides begin to curve.

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

loof (uncountable)

  1. The spongy fibers of the fruit of a cucurbitaceous plant (Luffa aegyptiaca).

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Dutch *lōf, from Proto-Germanic *laubą, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *leup- (peel, break off). Compare Low German Loov, German Laub, West Frisian leaf, English leaf, Danish løv.

NounEdit

loof n (uncountable)

  1. foliage
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

loof

  1. first-person singular present indicative of loven
  2. imperative of loven
Last modified on 3 September 2013, at 02:17