Last modified on 25 May 2014, at 13:52

palinspastic

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek πάλιν (pálin, again) + σπαστικός (spastikós, drawing).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pælɪnˈspæstɪk/
  • Rhymes: -æstɪk
  • Hyphenation: pal‧in‧spas‧tic

AdjectiveEdit

palinspastic (not comparable)

  1. (geology, of a map) Showing the previous location of geological features, correcting for any intervening crustal movements.
    • 1995, James L. Pindell, Kenneth D. Tabbutt, Mesozoic-Cenozoic Andean Paleogeography and Regional Controls on Hydrocarbon Systems, A. J. Tankard, Ramiro Suárez Soruco, Herman J. Welsink (editors), Petroleum Basins of South America, Volume 62, page 102,
      To improve the accuracy of spatial reconstruction through time, it is necessary to estimate and restore bulk strain by working backward in time so that the maps represent palinspastic reconstructions of geologic development.
    • 1996, M. P. A. Jackson, Chapter 1: Retrospective Salt Tectonics, M. P. A. Jackson, David G. Roberts, Sig Snelson (editors), Salt Tectonics: A Global Perspective, page 8,
      Exactly when the first palinspastic reconstruction was published is uncertain.
    • 2009, K. Ustaszewski, et al., A map-view restoration of Alpine-Carpathian-Dinaridic system for the early Miocene, Nikolaus Froitzheim, Stefan M. Schmid (editors), Orogenic Processes in the Alpine Collision Zone, Swiss Journal of Geosciences Supplementary Issue, page S276,
      Another set of palinspastic restorations aimed at restoring tectonic units based on the quantification of shortening amounts derived from balanced cross sections or from restoring offsets along major strike-slip faults.

Derived termsEdit

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