paparazzi

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Italian paparazzi, plural of paparazzo.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

paparazzi (uncountable) plural and, nonstandardly, singular

  1. plural form of paparazzo; freelance photographers who sell photographs of celebrities to the media, especially ones who pursue celebrities and attempt to obtain candid photographs.
    • 1985, Francis King, One Is a Wanderer: Selected Stories, Hutchinson, ISBN 0091620805, page 312,
      A number of paparazzi had gate-crashed, as had a famous tennis-player and a couple of pop-singers.
    • 2004, Noel Botham, The Murder of Princess Diana, Pinnacle Books, ISBN 0-7860-0700-1, page 168,
      A number of paparazzi were there to take pictures, clearly having received a further tip-off about the party’s movements.
    • 2007, Stanley Hart, "Oh, Brother", in Two Novellas, AuthorHouse, ISBN 1425987087, page 99,
      “Do you know how many paparazzi stalk those midtown hotels? […]”
  2. Used as a plurale tantum.
    • 1978, Stephen Birmingham, Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis, Grossett & Dunlap, ISBN 0448143062, page 184,
      The publicity that would ensue from a court battle with someone of Galella’s ilk would only be bad and would convey to Galella a degree of status and importance that this member of the paparazzi didn’t deserve.
    • 2005 April, Kathleen O'Reilly, The Diva’s Guide to Selling Your Soul, Simon and Schuster, ISBN 1416516565, page 36,
      He manages to snag you just when a member of the paparazzi is skulking by, […]
    • 2007, Chris Rojek, Cultural Studies, Polity, ISBN 0745636837, page 55,
      The member of the paparazzi is a Weegee-like figure played by Joe Pesci in the film The Public Eye (1992).
  3. (nonstandard) A paparazzo.
    • 1997, Eeva Joniken and Soile Veijola, "The Disoriented Tourist: The Figuration of the Tourist in Contemporary Cultural Critique", in Chris Rojek and John Urry (eds.), Touring Cultures: Transformations of Travel and Theory, Routledge, 0-415-11125-0, page 46,
      The job of a paparazzi is, roughly, to ‘reveal the truth’ about the rich and the famous.
    • 2000, David Naccache and Michael Tunstall, "How to Explain Side-Channel Leakage to Your Kids", in Çetin K. Koç and Christof Paar (eds.), Cryptographic Hardware and Embedded Systems — CHES 2000 (proceedings), Springer, ISBN 3-540-41455-X, page 229,
      A paparazzi is investigating the lives of a Royal couple.
    • 2005, Jude Idada, "Ouch!", in A Box of Chocolates, Trafford Publishing, ISBN 1412020268, page 221,
      What if someone I know sees me? Or what if a paparazzi is lurking somewhere?
  4. (nonstandard, uncountable) Paparazzi taken as a group.
    • 1989, Carol Muske-Dukes, Dear Digby, Viking, ISBN 0670825069, page 148,
      “Tell Page that PAPARAZZI is here, in my apartment. And then tell her that their offices are right across from us …”
    • 2001, Geert Lovink, "The Rise and Fall of Dotcom Mania", in Dark Fiber: Tracking Critical Internet Culture, MIT Press (2002), ISBN 0262621800, page 354,
      Rather, the business paparazzi is armoring itself for a backlash campaign against the entrepreneurial big mouths.
    • 2006, Kisha Green, And Even If I Did, iUniverse, ISBN 0595390137, page vi,
      Nelishia—You are a special lady with an enormous heart with skills that are off the chains!!! You go girl!!! A definite multi-tasking Diva!! Get your Chanel shades paparazzi is lurking…lol

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Italian paparazzi

NounEdit

paparazzi

  1. paparazzi

DeclensionEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Italian paparazzi

NounEdit

paparazzi m (plural paparazzis)

  1. a paparazzo, a member of the paparazzi

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

paparazzi m pl

  1. plural form of paparazzo
Last modified on 25 February 2014, at 21:30