Last modified on 14 February 2014, at 13:15

passe-partout

See also: Passepartout

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

French

NounEdit

passe-partout (plural passe-partouts)

  1. (obsolete) That by which one can pass anywhere; a safe-conduct.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dryden to this entry?)
  2. (obsolete) A master key; a latchkey.
  3. (obsolete) A light picture frame or mat of cardboard, wood, etc., usually put between the picture and the glass, and sometimes serving for several pictures.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


DutchEdit

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia nl

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pɑs.pɑrˈtu/
  • Hyphenation: pas‧se-par‧tout

EtymologyEdit

From French.

NounEdit

passe-partout m (plural passe-partouts, diminutive passe-partoutje n)

  1. mat (thick paper or paperboard border used to inset and center the contents of a frame)

ItalianEdit

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

passe-partout m (invariable)

  1. skeleton key, master key
  2. mat (thick paper or paperboard border used to inset and center the contents of a frame)