Last modified on 17 March 2015, at 16:19

rhyme or reason

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Attributed to the poet Edmund Spenser in a conversation with Queen Elizabeth I [1]. Translation from Middle French n'y avoir ryme ne raison (Eustache Deschamps).

NounEdit

rhyme or reason (uncountable)

  1. (idiomatic) Logic. Common sense.
    Prices vary considerably from one town to another with no apparent rhyme or reason.
    He would often fly into an unexpected rage without rhyme or reason.

Usage notesEdit

  • Almost always used in a negative form, particularly with no and without

TranslationsEdit

  1. ^ Wikipedia page for Edmund Spenser, Rhyme and reason topic