Last modified on 5 December 2014, at 00:29

samovar

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

A conical urn-shaped silver-plated samovar

EtymologyEdit

From Russian самова́р (samovár, self-boiler); from само (samo, self) + вари́ть (varítʹ, "to boil" or "to cook")

NounEdit

samovar (plural samovars)

  1. A metal urn with a spigot, for boiling water for making tea. Traditionally, the water is heated by hot coals or charcoal in a chimney-like tube which runs through the center of the urn. Today, it is more likely that the water is heated by an electric coil.
    • 1919, Ronald Firbank, Valmouth, Duckworth, hardback edition, page 107
      Come on now with the samovar - and make haste sorting the letter-bag.
    • 1932, Maurice Baring, chapter 20, Friday's Business[1]:
      Eurydice pointed to the cupboard, and sat down on the low divan with folded hands, and looked at the floor. [] Elsa made her drink a glass of vodka. Then she fetched the samovar from the kitchen, and made tea.

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Russian самова́р (samovár).

NounEdit

samovar m (plural samovars)

  1. samovar

External linksEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French samovar, from Russian самова́р (samovár).

NounEdit

samovar m (plural samovares)

  1. samovar (metal urn used to make tea)

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Russian самова́р (samovár), literally “self-boiler”; from само (samo) “self” + вари́ть (varítʹ) “to boil” or “to cook”.

NounEdit

samovar m (Cyrillic spelling самовар)

  1. samovar