Last modified on 2 June 2014, at 14:02

skol

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Danish skaal, Norwegian skaal, Swedish skål.

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

skol

  1. (originally and chiefly Scotland) A drinking-toast; cheers.
    • 1990, Alasdair Gray, ‘A Free Man with a Pipe’, Canongate 2012 (Every Short Story 1951-2012), p. 490:
      Again they notice he has impressed her and again he grows more cheerful, clinking his glass against hers and saying ‘Skol!’

VerbEdit

skol (third-person singular simple present skols, present participle skolling, simple past and past participle skolled)

  1. (Australia, slang, transitive) To down (a drink).
    • 2010, Penelope Green, When in Rome: Chasing la dolce vita
      When diners leave a quarter of a carafe full of house wine we put it above the sink to refill for new orders, but often I catch him skolling the remains of whatever he can get his hands on.
    • 2011, Richard Plant, Life's a Blur
      The Aussie skolled his beer, threw the Kiwi into the fireplace, and shot him.

BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin schola.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

skol f

  1. school

Derived termsEdit


CornishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Latin schola.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

skol f (plural skolyow)

  1. school