Last modified on 8 July 2014, at 11:05

snappish

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

snap +‎ -ish.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

snappish (comparative more snappish, superlative most snappish)

  1. Likely to snap or bite.
    A snappish cur
    • 1877, Anna Sewell, Black Beauty Chapter 22[1]
      "She came to us snappish and suspicious, but when she found what sort of place ours was, it all went off by degrees
  2. Exhibiting irritation or impatience; curt; irascible.
    • 1990, Nora Roberts, Taming Natasha, Silhouette Books (2011), ISBN 9781459213173, unnumbered page:
      She heard her own voice, snappish and rude, and pressed a hand to her head.
    • 2011, Lynne McTaggart, The Bond, Simon & Schuster (2011), ISBN 9781439157947, page 91:
      Even though the woman didn't work closely with Barsade, so palpable was her complaining and snappish temperament that it had infected everyone who worked around her.
    • 2011, Mary Doria Russell, Doc, Random House (2011), ISBN 9781400068043, page 173:
      There was something underneath her snappish belligerence that made him feel protective and tolerant.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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