unitive

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

from the Latin word unitivus; see unity

PronunciationEdit

(file)

AdjectiveEdit

unitive (comparative more unitive, superlative most unitive)

  1. Of, causing, or involving unity or union.
    • 1986, Jeffrey Burton Russell, Lucifer, the Devil in the Middle Ages, page 290:
      The mystics' fundamental vision was unitive: all things, including sinful creatures, are united with God.
    • 2003, Albert Joseph Mary Shamon, Firepower Through Confirmation, page 13:
      Starting with this principle, established by God, namely that sex must always be the expression of a love that is unitive (till death) and procreative (opened to life), we can arrive at a simple Sexual Ethics primer.
    • 2009, David Gershon, Social change 2.0: a blueprint for reinventing our world:
      It was unitive in that it directly asked each person to go beyond that which separates him or her from other people.

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Last modified on 30 March 2014, at 16:51