Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English ġeoc, from Proto-Germanic *juką, from Proto-Indo-European *yugóm. The forms with a long vowel are leveled from inflected forms, where open-syllable lengthening took place.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ȝok (plural ȝokkes)

  1. yoke (tool for attaching beasts of burden to a farm instrument).
  2. A yoked group of beasts of burden.
  3. The agreement and union of marriage.
  4. Compliance; the imposition of constraints, especially willingly.
  5. Cruelty or subjection to cruelty.
  6. Something that looks like a yoke.
  7. (rare) A challenge, burden or load.

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: yoke
  • Scots: ȝok, ȝoke, ȝock, ȝocke, yok, yoke

ReferencesEdit