Open main menu

Ancient GreekEdit

EtymologyEdit

From πολύς (polús, much) + μαθ- (math-), the root of μανθάνω (manthánō, to learn), +‎ -ής (-ḗs, adjective suffix).

PronunciationEdit

 

AdjectiveEdit

πολυμαθής (polumathḗsm or f (neuter πολυμαθές); third declension

  1. Having learnt much, knowing much
    • 436 BCE – 338 BCE, Isocrates, To Demonicus 18:
      Ἐάν ᾖς φιλομαθής, ἔσει πολυμαθής.
      Eán êis philomathḗs, ései polumathḗs.
      If you have a love of learning, you will become educated.
    • 422 BCE, Aristophanes, The Wasps 1175:
      ἄγε νυν, ἐπιστήσει λόγους σεμνοὺς λέγειν ἀνδρῶν παρόντων πολυμαθῶν καὶ δεξιῶν;
      áge nun, epistḗsei lógous semnoùs légein andrôn paróntōn polumathôn kaì dexiôn?
      And now, will you know how to speak of solemn things to these learned and upright men?

InflectionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: polymath

ReferencesEdit