кумир

RussianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old Church Slavonic коумиръ (kumirŭ), whose origin is uncertain. Perhaps a Turkic[1] or Semitic[2] borrowing: compare Classical Syriac ܟܘܡܪܐ(kūmrāʾ, priest), whence Old Armenian քուրմ (kʿurm, priest). Has also been connected to Ossetian гуымиры (g°ymiry, giant) and Georgian გმირი (gmiri, hero) and together with them derived from the name of Cimmerians.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [kʊˈmʲir]
  • (file)

NounEdit

куми́р (kumírm inan or m anim (genitive куми́ра, nominative plural куми́ры, genitive plural куми́ров)

  1. (paganism) idol, graven image
  2. (figuratively) beloved person

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Ranko Matasović (2016) "A READER IN COMPARATIVE INDO-EUROPEAN RELIGION". University of Zagreb. page 74. quote: "Gods were represented by giant statues (CSl. kumirъ a word of Turkic origin)."
  2. ^ Vasmer, Max (1964–1973), “кумир”, in Этимологический словарь русского языка [Etymological Dictionary of the Russian Language] (in Russian), translated from German and supplemented by Oleg Trubachyov, Moscow: Progress