Citations:mutant

English citations of mutant

Adjective: that has mutatedEdit

  • 1977, Harry Smith, The Molecular biology of plant cells, edition illustrated, University of California Press, ISBN 9780520034655, page 430:
    In genetic analyses of these four regenerated plants, three plants transmitted the mutant phenotype as a single recessive Mendelian factor and one displayed a more complex pattern of inheritance.
  • 1999, Paul J. J. Hooykaas, M. A. Hall, K. R. Libbenga, Biochemistry and molecular biology of plant hormones, Elsevier, ISBN 9780444898258, page 464:
    Therefore, mutant seedlings were isolated that show apical growth in the dark in the presence of low concentrations of cytokinin.
  • 2000, Rocky S. Tuan, Cecilia W. Lo, Developmental biology protocols, volume 2; 136, Humana Press, ISBN 9780896038530, page 154:
    Where the identity of the mutant gene is known, it is usually possible to identify the mutation directly, prefereably by PCR, [...]

English citations of mutant, in context of Marvel Comics

Adjective: having superpowersEdit

  • 2007, Peter Gardella, American angels: useful spirits in the material world[1], edition illustrated, University Press of Kansas, ISBN 9780700615377, page 18:
    Adolescents can follow the exploits of Archangel, a winged mutant hero among the X-Men, [...]
  • 2008, Robin S. Rosenberg, Jennifer Canzoneri, The psychology of superheroes: an unauthorized exploration, Jennifer Canzoneri, ISBN 9781933771311, page 76:
    [...] Charles Xavier, a mutant telepath responsible for creating the X-Men, observed that human beings are not yet ready to accept super-powered individuals in their midst (The X-Men #1).
  • 2009, Robin Anne Reid, Women in Science Fiction and Fantasy: Overviews, ABC-CLIO, ISBN 9780313335914, page 88:
    The series develops another interesting theme—the mutant person as evil—in characters such as Mystique and Magneto.

Adjective: of mutantsEdit

  • 2008, Samantha Baskind, Ranen Omer-Sherman, The Jewish graphic novel: critical approaches, edition illustrated, Rutgers University Press, ISBN 9780813543673, page 158:
    The abilities that mutation bestows are not in themselves good or evil, yet having powers is synonymous with taking power, for many humans—a connection that does in fact reflect more about human than about mutant behavior.
  • 2008, Shirrel Rhoades, A complete history of American comic books, edition illustrated, Peter Lang, ISBN 9781433101076, page 107:
    If you could have the mutant powers of any of the X-Men, which would you choose?
  • 2009, William Irwin, Rebecca Housel, Jeremy Wisnewski, X-Men and philosophy: astonishing insight and uncanny argument in the mutant X-verse, John Wiley and Sons, ISBN 9780470413401, page 232:
    Rogue's mutation is unique. She is in effect a universal mutant, capable of taking on the mutant power of any other mutant by simply coming into physical contact with that person.
  • 2010, William Irwin, David Kyle Johnson, Introducing Philosophy Through Pop Culture: From Socrates to South Park, Hume to House, John Wiley and Sons, ISBN 9781444334531, page 282:
    X-Men: The Last Stand explains mutant powers as coming from one single gene, called the mutant X-Gene. Every mutant has it, and it somehow causes his or her powers, [...]

Noun: one who is mutantEdit

  • 2006 23 May 2006, “Mutant is the new gay”, The Advocate, volume 963, Here Publishing, ISSN 0001-8996, page 44: 
    They found a perfect means to tell the story in the character of Rogue (Anna Paquin), a mutant whose very touch is deadly.
  • 2006, Chris Claremont, X-men The Last Stand[2], volume 3, Random House Publishing Group, ISBN 9780345492111:
    In the midst of an uneasy peace between humans and mutants, a human scientist discovers a cure that can transform mutants back into humans, [...]
  • 2009, William Irwin, Rebecca Housel, Jeremy Wisnewski, X-Men and philosophy: astonishing insight and uncanny argument in the mutant X-verse, John Wiley and Sons, ISBN 9780470413401, page 103:
    Magneto claims in the first X-Men movie that mutants are the future of humanity. his statements suggest that mutants are a subspecies of humans, Homo superior, a recent step on the evolutionary ladder.
  • 2009, William Irwin, Rebecca Housel, Jeremy Wisnewski, X-Men and philosophy: astonishing insight and uncanny argument in the mutant X-verse, John Wiley and Sons, ISBN 9780470413401, page 232:
    Rogue's mutation is unique. She is in effect a universal mutant, capable of taking on the mutant power of any other mutant by simply coming into physical contact with that person.
  • 2010, William Irwin, David Kyle Johnson, Introducing Philosophy Through Pop Culture: From Socrates to South Park, Hume to House, John Wiley and Sons, ISBN 9781444334531, page 282:
    X-Men: The Last Stand explains mutant powers as coming from one single gene, called the mutant X-Gene. Every mutant has it, and it somehow causes his or her powers, [...]
Last modified on 3 December 2010, at 01:44