EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

Megs

  1. plural of Meg (Megalodon)

Etymology 2Edit

Alternative formsEdit

Proper nounEdit

Megs

  1. plural of Meg
    • 1906, Comstock, Harriet Theresa, Meg and the Others, Thomas Y. Crowell Co., page 9:
      “Now Betty must name this girl. Anything you fancy, dear.” / “I like Margaret the best of all,” smiled Betty; “it is your name and mother’s name and my Margaret’s; besides, it’s easy and homey.” / “Very well,” nodded grandma, “but let us call her Meg for short. All Margarets are Megs when you get very intimate, and I imagine we shall get very intimate with this little friend.”
    • 1991, Miller, Vassar, If I Had Wheels Or Love: Collected Poems of Vassar Miller, Southern Methodist University Press, →ISBN, page 214:
      Then let’s all hold communion instead of confrontation, you Marys, Margarets, Megs, you mothers, sisters, daughters; it’s family reunion that finds by acclamation we’re sick of treading eggs.
    • 1992, Long News, in the Short Century:
      As a result, My beautiful lovely one, the Meg of all the Megs and Margarets and of all the Peggys and of my most Peggy & also of my Grace
    • 2019, Wattenberg, Laura, “Margaret”, in The Baby Name Wizard: A Magical Method for Finding the Perfect Name for Your Baby, 4th edition, →ISBN, page 136:
      Margaret, Katherine, and Elizabeth are the timeless English trio. They’re long but not showy, with bushels of nickname options to welcome your personal touch. Yet unlike her style sisters, Margaret has been slipping out of notice the past 40 yearrs. Time to bring on the Maggies! Or Megs, or Gretas, or Maisies...

Proper nounEdit

Megs

  1. A diminutive of the female given names Margaret or Megan.
    • 1990, Pfeffer, Susan Beth, “Chapter One”, in Meg At Sixteen: The Sebastian Sisters, Book Five, →ISBN:
      “You too,” Sybil said. “He had your first Vogue cover framed, and gave it to Megs. I thought that was a wonderful thing for him to do.” [] “Margaret Winslow Sebastian,” Evvie said suddenly. “I guess today she’s putting that name to rest as well.”
    • 1992, Garrod, Andrew, Adolescent Portraits: Identity, Relationships, and Challenges, Allyn & Bacon, →ISBN:
      Her name was Margaret, but since there were several other Margarets on the hall, she decided to call herself “Megs,” and then christened me “Germie” because I also studied German.
    • 2016 March, Powell, Syndi, “Prologue”, in The Sweetheart Deal: A Clean Romance, Harlequin Enterprises, →ISBN:
      Megan Sweet ran down the sidewalk past the shops on Lincoln Street and opened the door to the Sweetheart bakery. Stepping inside, she took a deep breath and savored for a moment the scents of yeast and sugar that filled the air. Grammy stood behind the counter refilling the glass display case with cookies. She glanced up at Megs and paused in her work.
    • 2016 April 10, Hastings Writers' Group, quoting Balp, Roz, “Tuscany at the Jerwood Gallery”, in Seawords, Lulu.com, →ISBN:
      'Good point, Megs. May I join you in a cup of tea? Catch up a little?' / 'Of course,' she replied, regretting her brief terseness. 'But I'm Margaret now. Megs is rather... Well, let's just say it always reminds me of those old louche times, and clearly I'm not that girl anymore.'

AnagramsEdit