See also: Singular, singulár, and singulär

English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English singuler, borrowed from Old French, from Latin singulāris (alone of its kind), from Latin singulus (single).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

singular (comparative more singular, superlative most singular)

  1. Being only one of a larger population.
    A singular experiment cannot be regarded as scientific proof of the existence of a phenomenon.
    Synonyms: individual; see also Thesaurus:specific
    Antonyms: general; see also Thesaurus:generic
  2. Being the only one of the kind; unique.
    She has a singular personality.
    Synonyms: unique; see also Thesaurus:unique
    • 1705, J[oseph] Addison, Remarks on Several Parts of Italy, &c. in the Years 1701, 1702, 1703, London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], →OCLC:
      The busts [] of the emperors and empresses are all very scarce, and some of them almost singular in their kind.
    • 1387–1400, Geoffrey Chaucer, “(please specify the story)”, in The Canterbury Tales, [Westminster: William Caxton, published 1478], →OCLC; Charles Cowden Clarke, editor, The Canterbury Tales of Chaucer. [], 2nd edition, volumes (please specify |volume=I, II, or III), Edinburgh: James Nichol; London: James Nisbet & Co.; Dublin: W. Robertson, 1860, →OCLC:
      And God forbid that all a company / Should rue a singular manne's folly.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • 1620, Francis Bacon, Novum Organum:
      singular instances
    • 1839, Charles Darwin, Narrative of the Surveying Voyages of His Majesty’s Ships Adventure and Beagle, between the Years 1826 and 1836, [], volume III, London: Henry Colburn, [], →OCLC, pages 461–462:
      A group of finches, of which Mr. Gould considers there are thirteen species; and these he has distributed into for new sub-genera. These birds are the most singular of any in the archipelago.
  3. Distinguished by superiority: peerless, unmatched, eminent, exceptional, extraordinary.
    a man of singular gravity or attainments
    Synonyms: exceptional, extraordinary, remarkable
  4. Out of the ordinary; curious.
    It was very singular; I don't know why he did it.
    Synonyms: curious, eccentric, funny, odd, peculiar, rum, rummy, strange, unusual; see also Thesaurus:strange
    • 1641 (first performance), [John Denham], The Sophy. [], 2nd edition, London: [] J[ohn] M[acock] for H[enry] Herringman, [], published 1667, →OCLC, Act I, scene ii, page 11:
      So ſingular a ſadneſs / Muſt have a cauſe as ſtrange as the effect: []
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book V”, in Paradise Lost. [], London: [] [Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker []; [a]nd by Robert Boulter []; [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], →OCLC; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, →OCLC:
      His zeal / None seconded, as out of season judged, / Or singular and rash.
  5. (grammar) Referring to only one thing or person.
    Antonym: plural
  6. (linear algebra, of matrix) Having no inverse.
    Synonym: non-invertible
    Antonyms: invertible, non-singular
  7. (linear algebra, of transformation) Having the property that the matrix of coefficients of the new variables has a determinant equal to zero.
  8. (set theory, of a cardinal number) Not equal to its own cofinality.
  9. (law) Each; individual.
    to convey several parcels of land, all and singular
  10. (obsolete) Engaged in by only one on a side; single.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun edit

singular (plural singulars)

  1. (grammar) A form of a word that refers to only one person or thing.
    Antonym: plural
  2. (logic) That which is not general; a specific determinate instance.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin singulāris. Doublet of senglar.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

singular m or f (masculine and feminine plural singulars)

  1. singular
    Antonym: plural

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Noun edit

singular m (plural singulars)

  1. (grammar) singular

Galician edit

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin singulāris.

Adjective edit

singular m or f (plural singulares)

  1. (grammar) singular

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Learned borrowing from Latin singulāris. Doublet of senheiro.

Pronunciation edit

 
 

  • Hyphenation: sin‧gu‧lar

Adjective edit

singular m or f (plural singulares)

  1. singular (being the only one of a kind)
    Synonym: único
  2. (grammar) singular (referring to only one thing)
    Antonym: plural

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Noun edit

singular m (plural singulares)

  1. (grammar) singular (form of a word that refers to only one thing)
    Antonym: plural

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin singularis or French singulier.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

singular m or n (feminine singular singulară, masculine plural singulari, feminine and neuter plural singulare)

  1. (grammar) singular

Declension edit

Serbo-Croatian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin singulāris.

Noun edit

sȉngulār m (Cyrillic spelling си̏нгула̄р)

  1. singular
    Synonym: jednìna

Declension edit

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Latin singulāris. Doublet of señero.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /sinɡuˈlaɾ/ [sĩŋ.ɡuˈlaɾ]
  • Audio (Colombia):(file)
  • Rhymes: -aɾ
  • Syllabification: sin‧gu‧lar

Adjective edit

singular m or f (masculine and feminine plural singulares)

  1. singular
    Antonym: plural
  2. odd, peculiar
    Synonyms: raro, peculiar

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Noun edit

singular m (plural singulares)

  1. singular
    Antonym: plural

Further reading edit