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Reconstruction:Proto-Balto-Slavic/masgas

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This Proto-Balto-Slavic entry contains reconstructed words and roots. As such, the term(s) in this entry are not directly attested, but are hypothesized to have existed based on comparative evidence.

Proto-Balto-SlavicEdit

EtymologyEdit

Derksen reviews two possibilities:[1]

  1. the Baltic Lithuanian mazgas (knot), dialectal mezgas, Latvian mezgls (knot), dialectal mezgs, mazgs (knotty) do not have cognates in Slavic, being cognate with Old High German māsca (mesh), Old Norse mǫskvi (mesh) with the latter from Proto-Germanic *mēskō, *maskō (mesh), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *mesg- (to knit).
  2. Alternatively the Baltic words for "knot" are cognate with Proto-Slavic *mȏzgъ (brain, marrow) (and additionally Old Norse mergr (marrow) < Proto-Germanic *mazgą (marrow)) ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *mosgʰós.

Either way Proto-Slavic *mȏzgъ (brain, marrow) is cognate with Lithuanian smãgenys (brain), Latvian smadzenes (brain), smaganas ((tooth) gums) with the latter from Proto-Indo-European *mosgʰen-.[2]

NounEdit

*masgas m[3][4]

  1. marrow
  2. brain

InflectionEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Latvian: mezgls (knot), dialectal mezgs, mazgs (knotty) (possibly)
  • Lithuanian: mazgas (knot) (possibly)
  • Slavic: *mȏzgъ (brain, marrow) (see there for further descendants)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Derksen, Rick (2015) Etymological Dictionary of the Baltic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 13), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 308
  2. ^ Derksen, Rick (2015) Etymological Dictionary of the Baltic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 13), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 413
  3. ^ Kim, Ronald (2018), “The Phonology of Balto-Slavic”, in Jared S. Klein, Brian Joseph, and Matthias Fritz, editors, Comparative Indo-European Linguistics: An International Handbook of Language Comparison and the Reconstruction of Indo-European[1], Berlin: de Gruyter
  4. ^ Derksen, Rick (2008), “*mȏzgъ”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Slavic Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 4), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 328: “*mozg-o-”