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See also: šif

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse, from sif (kindred, kinswoman); see also Old English sibb (kinship) (whence Middle English sib (having kinship; kinsmen), whence English sib, sibling), German Sippe (tribe).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sɪf/ (anglicized), or (approximating the Old Norse pronunciation) /siːf/[1][2]

Proper nounEdit

Sif

  1. (Norse mythology) A golden-haired goddess associated with earth, mother of Ullr and wife of Thor.
    • 1889, Viktor Rydberg, Teutonic Mythology, page 60,
      As already stated, Thor was, according to the Edda, married to Sibil, that is to say, the Sibylla, and the Edda adds that this Sibil is called Sif in the North. In the Teutonic mythology Thor's wife is the goddess Sif.
    • 2005, Nathan J. Johnson, Robert J. Wallis, Galdrbok: Practical Heathen Runecraft, Shamanism and Magic, page 309,
      For some contemporary Heathens, Lammas is sacred to Sif and Thunor (see Our Troth online Chapter LIII). In Snorri's Skaldskaparmal (see Faulkes 1998 [1987]: 96), Loki cropped Sif’s (presumably blonde or flaxen) hair, seemingly out of spite, a cropping which compares to the harvesting of corn. [] Sif’s golden hair is a contemporary kenning for the cornfield as it is caressed by the breeze and makes gentle waves.

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Joseph Thomas, Universal Pronouncing Dictionary of Biography and Mythology: Her to Z (1901)
  2. ^ Sif in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911., volume XI, The Century Cyclopedia of Names

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse Sif.

Proper nounEdit

Sif

  1. (Norse mythology) Sif.
  2. A female given name.

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse Sif.

PronunciationEdit

Proper nounEdit

Sif f

  1. (Norse mythology) Sif (wife of Thor)
  2. A female given name

DeclensionEdit