Open main menu

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Typhon +‎ -ic

AdjectiveEdit

Typhonic (comparative more Typhonic, superlative most Typhonic)

  1. Of or relating to Typhon or, by interpretatio graeca, his Egyptian equivalent Set.
    • 1891, William Henry Goodyear, The Grammar of the Lotus: A New History of Classic Ornament as a Development of Sun Worship. With Observations on the “Bronze Culture” of Prehistoric Europe, as Derived from Egypt; Based on the Study of Patterns, Part 1, page 235:
      It has been a matter of considerable difficulty to secure the evidence furnished in the Notes that these animals were Typhonic, symbols of Set, and ultimately reprobated representations in Egyptian art, subject to the destruction which has made the statuettes of the Typhonic God himself of highest rarity in the Museums.
    • 1970, Henry O. Thompson, Mekal, the God of Beth-Shan, page 135:
      At any rate, Muller goes on to note that when the myth was related to the sea, the latter changed from Osirian to Anti-Osirian, i.e. “Setian” or, Typhonic, to use the later Greek form.
    • 2005, Peter A. Warnek, Descent of Socrates: Self-knowledge and Cryptic Nature in the Platonic Dialogues, page 166:
      But how, then, can the Typhonic, even as a question, be introduced here precisely as a response to the story of Boreas? How can the memory of the most terrible monster of all time, still evident in the belching of Mount Aetna, a monster of the earth who sought violently to overthrow Zeus and his rule of the heavens, be related to the good son-in-law of Athens?

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit