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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French -ique, from Latin -icus, from Proto-Indo-European *-ikos, *-iḱos, formed with the i-stem suffix *-i- and the adjectival suffix *-ko-. Compare Ancient Greek -ικός (-ikós), Sanskrit (śa), (ka) and Old Church Slavonic -ъкъ (-ŭkŭ). Doublet of -y.

PIE *-ko- on noun stems carried the meaning 'characteristic of, like, typical, pertaining to', and on adjectival stems it acted emphatically.

SuffixEdit

-ic

  1. Used to form adjectives from nouns with the meaning “of or pertaining to”.
    Cyrillic
    acidic
  2. (chemistry) Used to denote certain chemical compounds in which a specified chemical element has a higher oxidation number than in the equivalent compound whose name ends in the suffix -ous. For example sulphuric acid (HSO₄) has more oxygen atoms per molecule than sulphurous acid (H₂SO₃).

Usage notesEdit

The suffix -ic is often added to words of Greek or Latin origin, but may also be used with other words, and in some cases is even added (redundantly) to adjectives, as in veganic (from vegan).

Derived termsEdit


Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin -icus.

SuffixEdit

-ic m (feminine -ica)

  1. -ic (of or pertaining to)

SuffixEdit

-ic m

  1. (chemistry) -ic

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin -iccus.

SuffixEdit

-ic m

  1. Used to form diminutive nouns.
Derived termsEdit



RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin -icus.

PronunciationEdit

SuffixEdit

-ic m, n (feminine singular -ică, masculine plural -ici, feminine and neuter plural -ice)

  1. Forms adjectives with the meaning "of or pertaining to".

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit