Aspies: Cultural language used by people with Asperger's et al - Discussion only Edit

Group noun used for a collective of persons working in a social and cultural group identified by diagnosis of Asperger's Disorder or similar condition, identified by behaviour, interests and coping mechanisms.

Previously used definitions (non-dictionary) include:

A cultural association as a group noun, as abstract ... The term was created to refer to "a culture and social group of persons with Asperger's syndrome (or since 2003 "Asperger's Disorder") High Functional Autism, Non-verbal Learning difficulty/disability, Tourettes, PDD-NOS and other similar diagnosis of an autistic spectrum disorder, or who self identify by skill, interest, ability, co-morbidities and co-existent disorders as belong to the community."

Dictionary definitions of the term, now over 20 years old in common usage include;

"Persons belonging to community with Asperger's Disorder HFA and related disorders"

"Social group of People with diagnosis or identify themselves with Asperger's syndrome, Asperger's Disorder, High Functional autism or related diagnosis or symptoms associated with an Autistic spectrum disorder"

My favourite is short and sweet: - "Term used by social group associated with Asperger's and related diagnosis and labels (pl)".

As Aspies is taken to refer to a class of people, and thus a group noun, was written with a Capital A and an "s" at the end. The concept of one person who is not a group is an oxymoron and somewhat of a misnomer.

Modern corruptions include a single "aspie" or "Aspy"; "Shadow Aspeys" or "Aspie by proxy", used in reports when psychiatrist fails to deal with multidisciplinary genetic history and believes such like children or siblings exhibit autistic like symptoms acquired including the mobility, genetic, sensory, neurological traits associated cannot exist and thus occur "by socialisation and environmental circumstances" of siblings, parents in a family (see Baron Münchhausen syndrome by Proxy); AsPys - not a known use known.

AspieNo1 (talk) 08:37, 15 October 2013 (UTC)Reply[reply]

Auties - Cultural language used by people with classic autism - Discussion only Edit

Group noun used for a collective of persons working in a social and cultural group identified by diagnosis of Autism or similar condition, identified by behaviour, interests and coping mechanisms. Aspies may regard this as a group they have a duty to assist in communication by offering peer advocacy, especially in light of often their previous association within this group before their intelligence, ability and coping mechanism caused them to get upgraded to a HFA dx.

Auties is less commonly used to Aspies, and traditionally used for persons with classic autism, involving general lack of verbal; communication, lesser developed ability and intelligence and abilities of note (traditionally referred to as Kanner's type Autism, classic autism or Low Functional Autism).

Dictionary definitions proposed include:

"Group noun for people identified by lack of communication or development, and intellectual; disability as autistic by diagnosis or Kanner's type, classic autism or Low Functional Autism, as opposed to people self-identifying themselves as Aspies."

"Group noun, used by people within the high-functional side of the spectrum to refer to other persons of lower functionality whose ability to communicate needs support and peer advocacy."

"Social group with limited communication ability and are generally low functional autistic, as defined by persons with Asperger's, NLD, Tourettes, PDD-NOS and Atypical Autism.

Auties is another term ... - is capitalised and with an s at the end is referring to a group of people in the autistic spectrum whose diagnosis and traits more resembles classic autism, rather then Aspies or Cousins - First recorded use 1995... Autie, autie, and auty singular does get used, but this does not involve the social group which marks the collective from which Aspies derived the term. As fewer people with LFA socialise, it is often conceded that a derived assumption of a single autie is likely, unlike communities of Aspies, where a group of 1 is really against the flow of the expressions origin to have a single "Aspies" or "aspie".