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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin abbreviatura, from Late Latin abbrevio (to shorten). See also abbreviate.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

abbreviature (countable and uncountable, plural abbreviatures)

  1. An abridgment; a compendium; an abstract. [since the late 16th century][1]
    • (Can we date this quote?), Jeremy Taylor, Via Pacis:
      This is an excellent abbreviature of the whole duty of a Christian.
  2. (obsolete) An abbreviated state or form. [only during the early to mid 17th century][1]
  3. A shortened form of a word or phrase, used in place of the whole; an abbreviation. [since the mid 17th century][1]
  4. (obsolete) The process of abbreviating. [only during the early to late 17th century][1]

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 “abbreviature” in Lesley Brown, editor-in-chief; William R. Trumble and Angus Stevenson, editors, The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 5th edition, Oxford; New York, N.Y.: Oxford University Press, 2002, →ISBN, page 3.

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

abbreviātūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of abbreviātūrus