Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Aquiline

EtymologyEdit

From Latin aquilīnus, from aquila(eagle)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

aquiline ‎(comparative more aquiline, superlative most aquiline)

  1. of, pertaining to, or characteristic of eagles; resembling that of an eagle.
    • 1748, Tobias Smollett, The Adventures of Roderick Random, Chapter 22, [1]
      He was about the age of two-and-twenty, among the tallest of the middle size; had chestnut-coloured hair, which he wore tied up in a ribbon; a high polished forehead, a nose inclining to the aquiline, lively blue eyes, red pouting lips, teeth as white as snow, and a certain openness of countenance—but why need I describe any more particulars of his person?
    • 1791, Edmund Burke, Appeal from the New to the Old Whigs, London: J. Dodsley, pp. 139-140, [2]
      Think of a genius not born in every country or every time: a man gifted by Nature with a penetrating, aquiline eye; with a judgment prepared with the most extensive erudition; with an herculean robustness of mind, and nerves not to be broken with labour; a man who could spend twenty years in one pursuit.
    • 1903, Arthur Conan Doyle, “The Adventure of the Empty House,” in The Return of Sherlock Holmes, [3]
      Holmes looked even thinner and keener than of old, but there was a dead-white tinge in his aquiline face which told me that his life recently had not been a healthy one.
    • 2004, Alan Hollinghurst, The Line of Beauty, Bloomsbury, 2005, Chapter 11 (iii),
      [] Wani, whose smooth sleekness had been part of his charm, seemed to Nick to grow leaner and ever more aquiline.
    Frank's aquiline nose jutted out from underneath his glasses.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit


FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

aquiline

  1. feminine singular of aquilin

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

aquiline

  1. feminine plural of aquilino

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

aquilīne

  1. vocative masculine singular of aquilīnus