LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Gaulish *arinca, from Proto-Celtic *(p)arwenkâ, from Proto-Indo-European *(p)Hwen, related to Hittite 𒉺𒅈𒄷𒄴𒈾𒀸 (kind of cereal).[1]

Pokorny suggests that this word may come from a Proto-Indo-European root common to Ancient Greek ἄρακος (árakos).[2], but Beekes writes that they are unrelated.[3]

PronunciationEdit

(Classical) IPA(key): /aˈrin.ka/, [äˈɾɪŋkä]

NounEdit

arinca f (genitive arincae); first declension

  1. A kind of grain also called olyra

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative arinca arincae
Genitive arincae arincārum
Dative arincae arincīs
Accusative arincam arincās
Ablative arincā arincīs
Vocative arinca arincae

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • arinca in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • arinca in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  1. ^ Fakulta (2005): Sbornâik pracâi Filosofickâe fakulty Brnéenskâe university: éRada jazykovéednâa. A, Issue 53
  2. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959) , “arenko-”, in Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume I, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, pages 66-67
  3. ^ Beekes, Robert S. P. (2010) Etymological Dictionary of Greek (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 10), with the assistance of Lucien van Beek, Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Related to arenque (herring), sharing a process in the fish's salting.

NounEdit

arinca f (plural arincas)

  1. haddock (marine fish)
    Synonyms: hadoque, eglefim

ReferencesEdit

  • Williams & Norgate (1864): An Etymological Dictionary of the Romance Languages; chiefly from the German of F. Diez. By T. C. Donkin