begrimed

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

begrimed

  1. simple past tense and past participle of begrime

AdjectiveEdit

begrimed (not comparable)

  1. Dirty, soiled, grimy.
    • 1847, Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre, Chapter 18,[1]
      I knew Mr. Rochester; though the begrimed face, the disordered dress [] , the desperate and scowling countenance, the rough, bristling hair might well have disguised him.
    • 1899 March, Joseph Conrad, “The Heart of Darkness”, in Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine, volume CLXV, number MI, New York, N.Y.: The Leonard Scott Publishing Company, [], OCLC 1042815524, part II:
      Trees, trees, millions of trees, massive, immense, running up high; and at their foot, hugging the bank against the stream, crept the little begrimed steamboat, like a sluggish beetle crawling on the floor of a lofty portico.
    • 1989, Hillel Halkin (translator), Five Seasons by A. B. Yehoshua, Doubleday, Part 4, Chapter 25, p. 277,[2]
      [] he was surprised to find some half-eaten stringbeans and a crushed pack of cigarettes in the garbage pail. Though he was tempted to salvage the half-empty pack, it was already much too begrimed.