concretum

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

concrete +‎ -um

NounEdit

concretum (plural concreta)

  1. (philosophy) Something that is concrete, rather than abstract.
    • 2008 August 5, Uriah Kriegel, “The dispensability of (merely) intentional objects”, in Philosophical Studies, volume 141, number 1, DOI:10.1007/s11098-008-9264-7:
      There are quite familiar and truly outstanding liabilities—ontological, epistemological, and phenomenological—associated with saying that merely intentional objects are abstracta, or mental concreta, or non-existent non-mental concreta.

Coordinate termsEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

concrētum

  1. nominative neuter singular of concrētus
  2. accusative masculine singular of concrētus
  3. accusative neuter singular of concrētus
  4. vocative neuter singular of concrētus

ReferencesEdit

  • concretum in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers