contraspective

EnglishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

contraspective (comparative more contraspective, superlative most contraspective)

  1. Having two contradictory aspects, as in a paradox or oxymoron.
    • 2013, Ben Irvine, “The paradoxicality of consciousness: a sketch of a theory”, in Journal of Experimental & Theoretical Artificial Intelligence, volume 25, number 3:
      Insofar as Intuitions 1 and 3 capture the essence of idealism and realism, respectively, those doctrines are contraspective.
    • 2014, Sarah Hall, Mrs Fox:
      If this does not pass, he thinks, he will take himself to the doctor, or her to the veterinary – one of them will discover the truth, the contraspective madness.
    • 2015, Gunter Swnft & Ellen B. Basso, Ritual Communication, →ISBN, page 245:
      Kalapalo also use two other forms with contraspective semantics. With these, the speaker references something that is observed or stated but that the mind of the speaker wishes were otherwise; the speaker seemingly knows (or pretends to know) that there is little if any possibility of that happening.

AnagramsEdit