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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin contradictorius, from Latin contradico.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

contradictory (comparative more contradictory, superlative most contradictory)

  1. That contradicts something, such as an argument.
  2. That is itself a contradiction.
  3. That is diametrically opposed to something.
    • Addison
      Schemes [] contradictory to common sense.
  4. Mutually exclusive.
  5. Tending to contradict or oppose, contrarious.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

contradictory (plural contradictories)

  1. (logic) Either of a pair of propositions, that cannot both be true or both be false.
    • 2001, Mark Sainsbury, chapter 1, in Logical Forms — An Introduction to Philosophical Logic, 2nd edition, Blackwell Publishing, →ISBN, §4, page 20:
      If one proposition is the negation of another, it follows trivially from the definition that the two propositions are contradictories. The converse does not hold. Two propositions can be contradictories without either being the negation of the other. For example:
         3) John is more than six feet tall
      and
         4) John is either exactly six feet tall or else less than six feet tall
      are contradictories, but neither is the negation of the other. Negation is one way, but not the only way, of forming a contradictory.

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